anatomy

Medical School Anatomy: Practice Exam Questions & Answers on Inguinal Anatomy, Inguinal Rings, and Inguinal Hernias

Medical School Anatomy: Test your knowledge with our anatomy practice exams and practice tests with provided questions and answers. Free practice exam questions and answers on inguinal anatomy, inguinal hernias, and inguinal rings.

Medical School Anatomy: Practice Exam – Practice Test Questions & Answers

Medical School Anatomy: Abdomen and Pelvis Topics

1. Anatomy Questions: Inguinal Anatomy and Inguinal Hernias

To gain a comprehensive understanding of the inguinal anatomy, inguinal rings and inguinal hernias, please check out our easy-to-understand educational article on the anatomy of hernias: Direct vs Indirect Hernias –> Then test your knowledge with the questions and practice test below!

Part 1. The Anatomy of Superficial and Deep Inguinal Rings: Practice Test Questions & Answers

Q: Describe the surface anatomy of the superficial and deep inguinal rings.
A: Superficial – immediately superolateral to the public tubercle

Deep Inguinal Ring – 1 cm superior to the inguinal ligament and 1 cm medial to its midpoint

Q: What lies in the preperitoneal space immediately medial to the deep ring?
A: Inferior epigastric vessels

Q: Certain kinds of congenital inguinal hernias are more frequent in premature than full-term baby boys. Which kind and why?
A: Congenital = indirect inguinal hernia

Q: What is the most common type of hernia in women?
A: Indirect Hernia (Surprise, it wasn’t femoral hernia. Femoral hernias are more common in women than compared to men, but femoral hernias are not the most common type of hernia.)

Q: What is the one kind of groin hernia that is equally or more common in women than in men, and why?

A: Femoral because women have relatively wider pelvis resulting in a relatively larger femoral ring

If you’re having trouble with these anatomy questions, be sure to check out our easy lesson on inguinal anatomy and inguinal hernias, and then come back here to test your knowledge!

Part 2. The Anatomy of Inguinal Rings and Hesselbach’s Triangle: Practice Test Questions & Answers

Q: Describe the surface anatomy of the deep and superficial inguinal rings.

A: Yes, we are asking this question again if you didn’t notice. Practice makes perfect!

superficial: immediately superolateral to the public tubercle; deep: 1 cm superior to the inguinal
ligament and 1 cm medial to its midpoint


Q: These rings are actually holes in other structures – name those structures

A: superficial: external oblique aponeurosis
deep: transversalis fascia


Q: What lies in the preperitoneal space immediately medial to the deep ring?

A: inferior epigastric vessels


Q: Which type of hernia passes through Hesselbach’s triangle?

A: direct hernia passes through the hesselbach’s triangle

Orient yourself to this picture. Rectus muscle is medial (in middle of the human body).

Part 3. Anatomy of Inguinal Hernias and Clinical Applications: Practice Test

3.During surgery to repair an inguinal hernia, you put a surgical staple immediately medial to the deep inguinal ring.
What is the worst consequence you might anticipate?

A: Hemorrhage from the inferior epigastric artery


After the patient recovers from the surgery, he complains of numbness over the front of his scrotum and on the inside of his upper thigh. What might have happened?

Ilioinguinal nerve has been damaged.

Check out this popular article to learn more about Direct Hernia vs Indirect Hernia!

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18 replies »

  1. You never see the unimaginable amount of information a doctor has to learn, memorize and remember when you watch those doctor shows on TV. This little exercise helped me understand – and appreciate – how tedious it must be to learn fact after fact (after fact) about the human body. I can see why so many doctors specialize: I have the poorest memory of anyone I know (one of the biggest reasons that I write). I can’t imagine having to commit the entire human body to memory. Not much wonder so many doctors I have known don’t really ‘get’ the mental health side of a patient: that’s a whole other field of study to learn…😬

    Liked by 2 people

    • Thank you for your insightful comment, Patti! Yes, indeed, there is an incredible amount of information to be learned for young medical students and aspiring physicians! To put into perspective, two semesters of biochemistry, for example, in undergraduate college are condensed into only a few weeks for medical students, on top of learning medical anatomy and all sorts. Sending lots of gratitude to our medical students and doctors around the world. We also have immense respect for all writers around the world! So thank you, Patti, for sharing your amazing stories! Cheers to the bright future ahead of us!

      Liked by 1 person

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